Earthwork Wilderness Survival Training School | 413-340-1161

Earthwork Survival Skills w/Zoar

 

This Program is an introduction to survival fires, shelter building and discovering wild edibles.

Learn skills that have been passed down for generations: starting fires without a match, building shelters that could save your life in an emergency situation, identifying and gathering wild edibles, and recognizing medicinal plants. Learn the skills to have peace of mind in the woods as well as be prepared for comfort in the outdoors without a tent.

Classes take place on the 90 acres on and around Zoar Outdoor in the beautiful Berkshire Mountains and Deerfield River Valley. No prior experience is required.

All full-day Programs will provide a delicious picnic-style lunch with salads, homemade breads for deli-style sandwiches, cookies and, perhaps, foraged edibles prepared over an open fire. A sheath with knife will also be provided for you.

Classes will be held rain or shine; please be prepared to be outdoors in the event of rain.

October 15, October 22, October 29
November 5, November 12, November 19

10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Minimum Age: 14, or 10 with an accompanying adult

$120/adult, $100/child; 50% deposit required

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER THROUGH ZOAR: http://www.zoaroutdoor.com/instruction/earthworks-survival-skills.htm

tracking, survival skills

Animal Tracking & Bird Language Workshop (WS 5)

$45/adult, $25/child w/adult (add $10/person if pay day of)

Animal Tracking + Bird Language (for adults, teens & families): There’s no better teacher than experience…learn and practice: the 5 arts of tracking, the art of questioning, 3 perspectives of trackings, mind’s eye training and field journaling! In our tracking classes, throughout the year, beginner and expert trackers come together and are immersed in ancient and modern teachings.

This is Workshop 5 of our Wilderness Extravaganza (see schedule below)

REGISTER ONLINE!

 

 

 

 

A Weekend of Wilderness Skills Workshops

Saturday, Sept 24, & Sunday, Sept 25, 2016

5 Workshops (click here for descriptions)! Attend all, some or just one!

Join Frank Grindrod & Earthwork Programs to learn new and practice old wilderness skills.

All Workshops are in Conway, MA

For Adults & Teens; some Workshops are great for Families too!

Saturday, 9/24

9:00-12:00 The Skill of the Knife WS 1  Adults, Teens, Families w/children 8 years+
1:00-4:00 Wild Edibles WS 2 Adults, Teens, Families
5:00-8:00 Primitive Cooking & Wilderness Cuisine WS 3 * Adults, Teens, Families

Sunday, 9/25
9:30-12:30 The Art of Fire WS 4 Adults, Teens, Families
1:30-4:30 Animal Tracking plus BONUS–Bird Language WS 5 Adults, Teens, Families

REGISTER NOW for one, some or ALL!

 

Bring your field guides, a journal and sense of wonder!

Register for all 5 Workshops, save 10% (prepaid)

MAKE A WEEKEND OF IT!

tentOpportunity to stay overnight on the land on Saturday night!
* Bring own tent & supplies–$5/person/night
* SOLD OUT (waitlist started) Rustic cabins w/bunkbeds (bring own linens/sleeping bags)–$8/person/night (very limited spots)
Both options have use of the kitchen, showers & toilets

NEED TO REGISTER FOR CAMPING BEFORE SEPTEMBER 18 (www.earthworkprograms.com and click REGISTER HERE and select the Camping box; be sure to include how many people)

Wilderness Extravaganza–4th Annual!

wild edibles--Autumn

A Weekend of Wilderness Skills Workshops

Saturday, Sept 24, & Sunday, Sept 25, 2016

5 Workshops (click here for descriptions)! Attend all, some or just one!

Join Frank Grindrod & Earthwork Programs to learn new and practice old wilderness skills.

All Workshops are in Conway, MA

For Adults & Teens; some Workshops are great for Families too!

Saturday, 9/24

9:00-12:00 The Skill of the Knife WS 1  Adults, Teens, Families w/children 8 years+
1:00-4:00 Wild Edibles & Medicinals WS 2 Adults, Teens, Families
5:00-8:00 Primitive Cooking & Medicine Making WS 3 * Adults, Teens, Families

Sunday, 9/25
9:30-12:30 The Art of Fire WS 4 Adults, Teens, Families
1:30-4:30 Animal Tracking plus BONUS–Bird Language WS 5 Adults, Teens, Families

REGISTER NOW for one, some or ALL!

 

Bring your field guides, a journal and sense of wonder!

Cost:

ALL WORKSHOPS EXCEPT WILD EDILBES & PRIMITIVE COOKING: Per Workshop–$45/adult, $25/child with adult prepaid (add $10/person/Workshop if pay day of)

WILD EDIBLES: $50/adult prepaid; $30/child with adult

PRIMITIVE COOKING: $65/adult prepaid; $30/child with adult–MUST BE PREPAID TO ATTEND THIS WORKSHOP

TOTAL $250 FOR ALL 5 FOR ONE ADULT, prepaid.

Register for all 5 Workshops, save 10% (prepaid)–$225!

 

MAKE A WEEKEND OF IT!

tentOpportunity to stay overnight on the land on Saturday night!
* Bring own tent & supplies–$5/person/night
* SOLD OUT (waitlist started) Rustic cabins w/bunkbeds (bring own linens/sleeping bags)–$8/person/night (very limited spots)
Both options have use of the kitchen, showers & toilets

NEED TO REGISTER FOR CAMPING BEFORE SEPTEMBER 18 (www.earthworkprograms.com and click REGISTER HERE and select the Camping box; be sure to include how many people)

REGISTER ONLINE!

Hunter-Gatherer

Making a BowMonday, August 8-Friday, August 12, 2016, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
$315-$375, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
For Preteens & Teens

Introduction to hunting and gathering.
Learn how to skin an animal, process wild food, primitive cooking, make net bags and cordage, primitive fishing (stone and bone tools). As time permits, we may work on bows.

REGISTER HERE

SUMMER CAMPS 2016 SCHEDULE

ALL Summer Camps (Leader in Training, At Home in the Woods, Way of the Scout and Hunter-Gatherer) are held in Conway, MA.

All weeks are Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. EXCEPT JULY 4 WEEK–Tuesday, 7/5-Friday, 7/8.

June 20-24: At Home in the Woods SC1, ages 7+
June 27- July 1: At Home in the Woods SC2, ages 7+
July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): At Home in the Woods SC3, ages 7+ ($252-$300, sliding scale, for 4 days)
July 11-15: At Home in the Woods SC4, ages 7+
July 18-22: At Home in the Woods SC5, ages 5 to 7 AND 7+
July 25-July 29: At Home in the Woods SC6, ages 7+
August 15-August 19: At Home in the Woods SC7, ages 7+

(As weeks fill, we will note **FULL** and will start waitlists for those Programs.)

Unless noted, all weeks are $315-$375, sliding scale, per child per week ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration)

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SPECIFICALLY FOR PRETEENS & TEENS:

Leader in Training 2016–July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): Leader in Training*, ages 12+. $252-$300, sliding scale, per child (FOR 4 DAYS) ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration).
* Leader in Training: Specifically for those interested in becoming a peer mentor (see below for more)
Way of the Scout—August 1-5, ages 10+ (pre-requisite: child must attend At Home in the Woods or an Earthwork Programs weekly seasonal Program prior to attending). $380-$430, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
Hunter-Gatherer—August 8-12, ages 12+. $315-$375, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.

Way of the Scout

way of scout 14Monday, August 1-Friday, August 5, 2016, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., with an overnight Thursday-Friday!
$380-$430, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
10+ year olds who have attended At Home in the Woods or 1 of our seasonal Programs

Wilderness Skills and Martial Arts

Limited Spots! (10)
REGISTER HERE

While attending our At Home in the Woods Summer Programs, your children learn wilderness skills that the “village” does together.

In Way of the Scout, your children learn how to develop proficiency with their own skills. They will practice:
* advanced firemaking, shelter building and camouflage
* blindfold activities
* learning to listen to inner vision…meditation
* water stalking
* night movement (how to move in the night without a flashlight)
* calling in owls
* campfire stalking

They will learn martial arts movements, animal forms, advanced stalking and stick fighting (a way to learn balance, coordination and strength). Warriorship training is not about war…it’s about being able to take care of those who cannot take care of themselves…very empowering for all!

With a close-knit community, we will all help each other grow into the Way of the Scout.

SUMMER CAMPS 2016 SCHEDULE

ALL Summer Camps (Leader in Training, At Home in the Woods, Way of the Scout and Hunter-Gatherer) are held in Conway, MA.

All weeks are Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. EXCEPT JULY 4 WEEK–Tuesday, 7/5-Friday, 7/8.

June 20-24: At Home in the Woods SC1, ages 7+
June 27- July 1: At Home in the Woods SC2, ages 7+
July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): At Home in the Woods SC3, ages 7+ ($252-$300, sliding scale, for 4 days)
July 11-15: At Home in the Woods SC4, ages 7+
July 18-22: At Home in the Woods SC5, ages 5 to 7 AND 7+
July 25-July 29: At Home in the Woods SC6, ages 7+
August 15-August 19: At Home in the Woods SC7, ages 7+

(As weeks fill, we will note **FULL** and will start waitlists for those Programs.)

Unless noted, all weeks are $315-$375, sliding scale, per child per week ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration)

———————————————————————————————-

SPECIFICALLY FOR PRETEENS & TEENS:

Leader in Training 2016–July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): Leader in Training*, ages 12+. $252-$300, sliding scale, per child (FOR 4 DAYS) ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration).
* Leader in Training: Specifically for those interested in becoming a peer mentor (see below for more)
Way of the Scout—August 1-5, ages 10+ (pre-requisite: child must attend At Home in the Woods or an Earthwork Programs weekly seasonal Program prior to attending). $380-$430, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
Hunter-Gatherer—August 8-12, ages 12+. $315-$375, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.

The Mystery of Moose and How to Find Them

Moose are the ghosts of the forest

Moose are these amazing creatures that can be really close to us, and we would never realize it because they can blend into the landscape even though they are over seven feet tall and can weigh up to a ton (2,000 lbs.) and have antlers that can reach six feet across!

The odds are stacked in our favor 

moose 5

How do we notice that they have been in an area? According to research by Sue Morse of Keeping Track, “An estimated 80,000 moose live in the Northeast, which practically guarantees an opportunity to see one.”

Where can I find moose tracks and sign?

The key word here is “habitat.” This is the natural home or environment for an animal to live in.

Moose habitat is an area that has lots of brush exposed overgrown fields and meadows and also transition areas where different forest types meet, i.e., field into oak hickory forest. There is also a lot of activity of feeding and bedding in wetlands that are regenerating after a family of beavers has left.

Another place to see moose is where there has been a clear-cut or some sort of break in the forest, like a harvested plot or logged area in regrowth and has been able to have pioneer species of low growing plants, trees and shrubs.

An important step is get to know your trees

moose 4

Animals often have very special relationships to plants, trees and shrubs, and by understanding what moose feed on, you improve your chances of moose sighting and study. Do you know what a Red Maple tree looks like—we are surrounded by them; they are one of the top 10 trees in Massachusetts. The ones were looking for are between 3 and 10 inches in diameter, they have a smooth gray bark, opposite branching and bright red buds that are clustered. This is probably the tree I see that is affected by moose more than any other.

Striped maple is a shrub that is very common and is green; that’s right…the tree bark is green with white flecks and stripes in it. This is a favorite of moose, hence its nickname–moose wood maple.

Moose feeding sign

moose 2

Moose have this incredible ability to be able to reach up to 10 feet, sometimes higher when they get on their hind legs or depending upon snowpack but what they’re most known for is “walk over’s”—this is where they straddle a young sampling and walk over it while feeding; then the mass of their body lowers down the tree and they just feed while they’re walking…sometimes the branch breaks off at the tip. So think about how many times you’ve walked by these and wondered; now you know that this is the sign of the moose, especially if you look at the ends of the branches and they’ve been chewed off (a deer would suckle off the ends and pull, leaving a tattered end; since moose are in the same family of deer, they also don’t have top teeth).

One of the most exciting things I have experienced is being so close up to them and not even knowing it until I pick up the movement in my peripheral vision that alerts me to seeing their ghost-like movement through the forest.

moose 1

Always remember moose are wild animals and like any wild animals, can be unpredictable; it’s important to be careful when interacting with the wildlife.

Enjoy the outdoors,
Frank

Winter Survival Program (during Vacation) –All 4 Days (Tue-Fri)

Register & prepay by 2/12 for all 4 days (Tue-Fri) & receive sliding-scale discount option @ $264-$280/child for 4 days.

If not available for the 4 days, your child can attend @ $72/day (2-day minimum)

 

Ages 8 and up (limit 8)

Tuesday, 2/16, through Friday, 2/19

9:00 am-3:00 pm

Experience the WILD in winter in our beautiful forest and fields! While spending lots of time outdoors, we will

  • track animals and find the special places of the fox, deer, bobcat and others…we will get a glimpse of their secret winter life.
  • build winter shelters: a quinzee, a lean to, a zarsky…various methods to stay warm and dry.
  • test our fire-making skills in the snow…we will help each other learn the best techniques with and without matches, then bask in the warmth of our accomplishments in our wilderness home.

We will enjoy hanging out around the fire, staying warm in shelters that we make, sharing lunch and cool stories and other natural mysteries.

Bonus: we will also learn about ice safety and hypothermia and how to stay safe outdoors in the winter. We will pick up strategies of staying warm by playing games and other activities.

All of this for $264-$280, sliding scale, for 4 days! (if pay by 2/12; after 2/12, $280/4 days).

If not available for the 4-day Program, 2-day minimum at $72/day.

REGISTER ONLINE

call 413-340-1161 for more information.

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

F&M Great Swamp FallAs we walk into the forest, we see all the different types trees, and we know, somehow, that they all have a purpose in life, just like we do. We notice many have lost their leaves this time of year, and the forest looks completely different—kind of empty because you can see so far, and it is very open. However, that is just the surface; let’s look closer.

The conifers take center stage with their deep green and contrast to the snow; while they do shed their needles, they are primarily green all year, which is why they are called “evergreens.”

Using touch—reach out and feel the needles

hemlock branchWhen we reach out and feel the needles, and when we rubbed them in our hands and smell, there is that amazing pine scent reminiscent of a Christmas tree—that strong aroma that can remind us of the holidays.

Visual things to watch for

As we look even closer, we notice really short needles (less than an inch) that are flat and on the underside, there are distinct white lines like racing stripes; this is an excellent identification characteristic. It also has the tiniest little stem you can barely see. In botanical terms, when you look it up in your field guide, this is called a “petiole.”

Feel the texture of the bark

These trees have really smooth bark when very young, and as they get older, it becomes stiff and deeply furrowed (creating indented grooves). Look at many different trees—young and old—and compare the feeling of the bark, and how the young ones are really tender and the older ones are like a rock.

hemlock 2Natural history viewing our past

In the 1800s, Eastern hemlock (Tsuga Canadenses) was used heavily; these trees would be anywhere from 250 to 800 years old. They were harvested in great numbers and were sought after for a special quality they possess: great amounts of tannic acid—up to 12%—used for tanning hides and preserving leather; the outer bark was used and soaked. Some of the hides were kept in vats (barrels of soaking tannins) for up to six months in order for them to turn the dark tea color and create a preserve and coloring for the produced leather. Hemlock tanneries were all over the Northeast, and they shipped the hides from here all over the world.

What I have personally seen, and you can too!

hemlock 1In the picture, you can see the needles and the bark. You can see underneath the very outer light brown bark, there is a dark purple color; this is a great characteristic for being able to identify Eastern hemlock.

What use are these trees now? They are a tremendous resource for wildlife: the needles create shade to give animals and birds cover. So they are used for nesting, denning and protection from the elements.

I often find many deer and moose in these areas…tracks, signs and tons of “browse” (feeding sign). This is where deer “yard up” (all stay in same area communally); this helps create safety in numbers and helps avoid being surprised by coyotes. It also makes it easier for them to move, because they pack down the snow to conserve their energy during these hard winter months.

I’ve also found coyotes’ beds, which look like circles; the heat from the coyote’s body melts out the impression of its nose where he/she is melting snow with the breath.

Outdoor challenge and scavenger hunt you can do with your children

See if you can find the interior bark that is purple. Hint: When you look around at the base of the tree, you can see the flakey bark chips; look under there.

Tracks and sign: if you look on the very tops of the branches, close to the trunk, you will often see squirrel territorial teeth marking sign, or going up a mature tree, you can see the claw marks and sometime bite marks of our black bears climbing since they use Eastern hemlock as babysitter trees (mama sends her cubs up them in times of danger or when she is away for long periods).

And at the bottom of the hemlocks, underneath the dense needles protecting from the wind and elements, you can find deer, fox, moose and bear beds. Let’s not forget the calling cards of raccoon and porcupine too—scat!

If you find little holes and black powder on the ground and through the roots, it’s possible you have found Truffles (fungus).

Can you find the little Hemlock cones that look like little tiny pine cones—about ½ inch. Can you find the racing stripes on the underside of the needles?

In the News!Wilderness Survival, Primitive skills and Nature with kids

Earthwork Programs is grateful for all the press we received this Summer! The Recorder and the Daily Hampshire Gazette visited our At Home in the Woods and Way of the Scout Summer Camps and captured the moments…

“Research shows that kids can’t identify many common plants or trees in their environment, but they can identify 500 corporation logos,” Grindrod said. “Imagine what they would know if learning about the environment was instilled in our culture rather than learning how to be good consumers.”

Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary, Hitchcock Center, Earthwork Programs connect children and environment

By FRAN RYAN Gazette Contributing Writer
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
(Published in print: Wednesday, August 6, 2014)

On a hot summer day in mid-July, Rainier Jewett, 8, of Florence rose up from the underbrush in the woods of Conway covered in mud and forest debris and sporting a broad, sly smile.

Then several more young campers, including Caleb Schmitt 13, and Ari Benjamin 10, both of Williamsburg, also emerged from the forest. They were all participating in a summer day camp run by the Earthwork Programs.

Frank Grindrod, is director and founder of Earthwork, which offers wilderness education programs and teaches emergency survival and self-sufficiency skills. Grindrod described how his programs help people of all ages learn to broaden their ways of seeing, in order to understand, survive, and thrive in the natural world, and along the way he paused to talk about plants that were native to the area.

…click here to read rest of the article…

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Honing skills that work beyond the wilderness

By TOM RELIHAN
Recorder Staff
Sunday, August 24, 2014
(Published in print: Monday, August 25, 2014)

CONWAY — Frank Grindrod has noticed a trend that disturbs him deeply. To see it, he said, all one must do is compare a child’s ability to recognize corporate logos to their capacity for identifying wild plants and animals.

“You show them a ‘Hello Kitty’ logo and they’re like, ‘Oh, I know that one,’” he said, as we walked through a dense pine forest in Conway. He stopped to bend down and examine a patch of leafy green plants on a plot of land, which had sprung up under a rare, sun-soaked gap in the canopy. Cupping the leaf of one plant in his hand, he said, “But you show them one of these, and they say, ‘Uhh … a fern?”

That trend — one he defined as a decline in knowledge of and appreciation for nature among young people — is one he is determined to change.

“A lot of the nature education is on the surface,” he said. “Some of the kids are good with their hands, and that’s great, but for the ones that aren’t, we feed them stories that they can then share with the group. That way, everyone gets a specialization and it grows exponentially.”

…click here for the whole article…

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“I began to wonder why some kids weren’t out in the park or playground and needed to have everything spelled out for them and facilitated,” Grindrod said, noting that when he was growing up, that type of thing wasn’t as commonplace. “We spent most of our time in the woods, and everyone just had a special call or bell when it was time to come home.”

Learning naturally: Nature programs take the classroom outside

Story by Tom Relihan & Fran Ryan
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
(Published in print: Saturday, August 30, 2014)

As he crested a densely wooded, moss-covered hill in the middle of Conway’s pine forest, Edwin Anderson, 13, of Greenfield yelled, “Wow, come and look at this!

At his call, a half-dozen other kids scrambled up the hill. Some dropped to their knees as they examined a huge brown mushroom protruding from the pine needles on the forest floor. Moments later, Frank Grindrod of Conway knelt in the middle of the group and began to inspect the fungal wonder.

“See how it’s all shaggy on top and on the stipe? This is called ‘The Old Man of the Woods.’” he said. “Oh, and look at this one!” he said, picking up a piece of bark with a couple of fuzzy, pink mushrooms growing on it.

“It looks like the Lorax!” exclaimed one of the campers.

That day, the kids were out in the woods as part of Grindrod’s Earthwork Programs summer camp, which he runs to teach children about nature and develop skills that they can use in their everyday lives.

…click here to read more of this article…

 

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