Earthwork Wilderness Survival Training School | 413-340-1161
homeschool Earthwork Programs

Homeschool Programs–Fall Session

FALL SESSION: 12 weeks (FRIDAYS–mid September through early December, skip Friday after Thanksgiving)

NEW THIS FALL–there will be an overnight for the Homeschool students…details will come soon.

HERON HOMESCHOOL
Heron is our signature program, taking place on Larch Hill Conservation Area in Amherst for more than 15 years. Hundreds of students have taken the challenge of the Heron, and have developed their nature awareness and wilderness living skills.

Curriculum covered is seasonal according to the natural laws and cycles of nature. For the development of wilderness living skills, it is necessary that we follow the rhythms of the Earth by harvesting materials and creating our earthen wares in the proper season.

WHO: Ages 7 and up
WHERE: Amherst, Massachusetts
WHEN: Fridays, 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.; Fall, Winter and Spring sessions
HOW MUCH: $670-$850/12-week FALL session (INCLUDES JOURNAL/HANDBOOK); 50% is due upon registration; balance due within 2 weeks after start of Program (payment plan is available)

REGISTER FOR FALL HERON

 

SWIFT EAGLE HOMESCHOOL
In the Heron Program, we began a foundation of learning nature awareness and wilderness living skills. The Swift Eagle Program introduces many new skills and adventures while building on the foundations of the Heron Program.

WHO: Preteens & Teens
WHERE: Amherst, Massachusetts
WHEN: Fridays, 9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.; Fall, Winter and Spring sessions
HOW MUCH: $670-$850/12-week FALL session (INCLUDES JOURNAL/HANDBOOK); 50% is due upon registration; balance due within 2 weeks after start of Program (payment plan is available)

REGISTER FOR FALL SWIFT EAGLE

 Call 413-340-1161 if you have questions

making fire on snow wilderness skills

Wilderness Outdoor Adventure Bobcat Monthly Program

For new and returning students. Enjoy a monthly day of fun and hands-on experience with wilderness skills: wildlife tracking, primitive fire making, shelter building, plant identification, scout invisibility and more. Plenty of outdoor adventure.

WHO: Ages 8+
WHERE: Conway and other Locations in the Pioneer Valley, Massachusetts
WHEN: Saturdays, March 25, April 22, May 27
HOW MUCH:
$65-$75/class, sliding scale

 

REGISTER FOR BOBCAT PROGRAM



My son participates in a weekly afterschool program and summer camps with Earthworks. Anything Earthworks is his favorite thing to do. Earthworks provides a perfect balance of learning, fun, and self-discovery that leaves my son feeling happier, smarter, and more fulfilled. When he is out in the woods with the Earthworks staff, he gets to experience the best of himself, and that leads to a sense of serenity and self-confidence that carries over into his life at home and at school. We feel lucky to have such an amazing program in our community. WolfQuest-Amherst Parent

Winter Skills Day!

WS 1 WinterFire, 9 am-12 pm
WS 2 Trapping: The Sacred Harvest, 1-4 pm

 

WinterFire Workshop (WS 1)

Skiers, Snowmobilers, Ice Fisherman, Hunters, Outdoor Enthusiasts!

Have you ever struggled to get a fire going?

What if you and your family are hiking, skiing or out for a drive and get stranded?

A fun outing can become a potential life threatening emergency rather quickly given certain conditions. How would you stay warm?

A fire may be the difference between life and death.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR WINTERFIRE!

This 3-hour Workshop will not only entertain you, but it may save your life! You’ll learn how to take these 3 things, and why you should have them every time the temperature drops below 32 degrees…
because they will start a fire every single time you apply the methods you will learn in this Workshop.

Do you worry about family members…perhaps teenagers or children…in the woods? You may want to bring your mature teens to this Workshop.

Would you ever go on a boat without a life vest; drive without a seatbelt; let kids swim without a lifeguard? Probably not…and you should not go into the freezing cold wilderness without this training.

At our WinterFire Workshops, you’ll learn one of the most important outdoor skills: how to survive in the wilderness in winter and develop some outdoor survival skills in fire-starting methods and techniques.

WHO: Adults, Teens
WHEN: December 11, 9 am-12 pm
WHERE: Conway, MA
HOW MUCH: $45/person prepaid (add $10/person if pay day of)

 

Trapping: The Sacred Harvest (WS 2)

When people hear the word “trapping,” there might be certain images or stereotypes. Allow yourself to look deeper into what trapping is. This is an important skill that teaches us how to have an intimacy with the land and the animals. You need to know about tracking, animal runs, feeding areas, bedding areas and everything that makes a healthy ecosystem in balance. Placement is so critical when trapping. Camouflaging your scent is also critical. You need to learn the pattern of the animal in order to trap it. You also need to know the populations of the animals that you are working with because trapping as a past-time and as an ancestoral skill carries with it great responsibility and ethics.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR TRAPPING

Join us for an introduction to learn how to build 3 primary traps and develop proficiency in making and setting figure 4, the paiute and rolling snare. From these 3 foundational traps, you will have everything you need in order to learn the skills of trapping. This will help develop knife skills and learn how to harvest your materials in a sacred manner.

WHO: Adults, Teens
WHEN: December 11, 1-4 pm
WHERE: Conway, MA
HOW MUCH: $45/person prepaid (add $10/person if pay day of)

 

CALL 413-340-1161 if you have questions.

 

 

Earthwork Survival Skills with Zoar

This Program is an introduction to survival fires, shelter building and discovering wild edibles.

Learn skills that have been passed down for generations: starting fires without a match, building shelters that could save your life in an emergency situation, identifying and gathering wild edibles, and recognizing medicinal plants. Learn the skills to have peace of mind in the woods as well as be prepared for comfort in the outdoors without a tent.

Classes take place on the 90 acres on and around Zoar Outdoor in the beautiful Berkshire Mountains and Deerfield River Valley. No prior experience is required.

All full-day Programs will provide a delicious picnic-style lunch with salads, homemade breads for deli-style sandwiches, cookies and, perhaps, foraged edibles prepared over an open fire. A sheath with knife will also be provided for you.

Classes will be held rain or shine; please be prepared to be outdoors in the event of rain.

October 15, October 22, October 29
November 5, November 12, November 19

10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Minimum Age: 14, or 10 with an accompanying adult

$120/adult, $100/child; 50% deposit required

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER THROUGH ZOAR: http://www.zoaroutdoor.com/instruction/earthworks-survival-skills.htm

Earthwork Survival Skills with Zoar

This Program is an introduction to survival fires, shelter building and discovering wild edibles.

Learn skills that have been passed down for generations: starting fires without a match, building shelters that could save your life in an emergency situation, identifying and gathering wild edibles, and recognizing medicinal plants. Learn the skills to have peace of mind in the woods as well as be prepared for comfort in the outdoors without a tent.

Classes take place on the 90 acres on and around Zoar Outdoor in the beautiful Berkshire Mountains and Deerfield River Valley. No prior experience is required.

All full-day Programs will provide a delicious picnic-style lunch with salads, homemade breads for deli-style sandwiches, cookies and, perhaps, foraged edibles prepared over an open fire. A sheath with knife will also be provided for you.

Classes will be held rain or shine; please be prepared to be outdoors in the event of rain.

October 15, October 22, October 29
November 5, November 12, November 19

10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Minimum Age: 14, or 10 with an accompanying adult

$120/adult, $100/child; 50% deposit required

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER THROUGH ZOAR: http://www.zoaroutdoor.com/instruction/earthworks-survival-skills.htm

Hunter-Gatherer

Making a BowMonday, August 8-Friday, August 12, 2016, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
$315-$375, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
For Preteens & Teens

Introduction to hunting and gathering.
Learn how to skin an animal, process wild food, primitive cooking, make net bags and cordage, primitive fishing (stone and bone tools). As time permits, we may work on bows.

REGISTER HERE

SUMMER CAMPS 2016 SCHEDULE

ALL Summer Camps (Leader in Training, At Home in the Woods, Way of the Scout and Hunter-Gatherer) are held in Conway, MA.

All weeks are Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. EXCEPT JULY 4 WEEK–Tuesday, 7/5-Friday, 7/8.

June 20-24: At Home in the Woods SC1, ages 7+
June 27- July 1: At Home in the Woods SC2, ages 7+
July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): At Home in the Woods SC3, ages 7+ ($252-$300, sliding scale, for 4 days)
July 11-15: At Home in the Woods SC4, ages 7+
July 18-22: At Home in the Woods SC5, ages 5 to 7 AND 7+
July 25-July 29: At Home in the Woods SC6, ages 7+
August 15-August 19: At Home in the Woods SC7, ages 7+

(As weeks fill, we will note **FULL** and will start waitlists for those Programs.)

Unless noted, all weeks are $315-$375, sliding scale, per child per week ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration)

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SPECIFICALLY FOR PRETEENS & TEENS:

Leader in Training 2016–July 5-8 (Tuesday-Friday): Leader in Training*, ages 12+. $252-$300, sliding scale, per child (FOR 4 DAYS) ($150 nonrefundable deposit due upon registration).
* Leader in Training: Specifically for those interested in becoming a peer mentor (see below for more)
Way of the Scout—August 1-5, ages 10+ (pre-requisite: child must attend At Home in the Woods or an Earthwork Programs weekly seasonal Program prior to attending). $380-$430, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.
Hunter-Gatherer—August 8-12, ages 12+. $315-$375, sliding scale; $150 nonrefundable deposit required.

In the News!Wilderness Survival, Primitive skills and Nature with kids

Earthwork Programs is grateful for all the press we received this Summer! The Recorder and the Daily Hampshire Gazette visited our At Home in the Woods and Way of the Scout Summer Camps and captured the moments…

“Research shows that kids can’t identify many common plants or trees in their environment, but they can identify 500 corporation logos,” Grindrod said. “Imagine what they would know if learning about the environment was instilled in our culture rather than learning how to be good consumers.”

Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary, Hitchcock Center, Earthwork Programs connect children and environment

By FRAN RYAN Gazette Contributing Writer
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
(Published in print: Wednesday, August 6, 2014)

On a hot summer day in mid-July, Rainier Jewett, 8, of Florence rose up from the underbrush in the woods of Conway covered in mud and forest debris and sporting a broad, sly smile.

Then several more young campers, including Caleb Schmitt 13, and Ari Benjamin 10, both of Williamsburg, also emerged from the forest. They were all participating in a summer day camp run by the Earthwork Programs.

Frank Grindrod, is director and founder of Earthwork, which offers wilderness education programs and teaches emergency survival and self-sufficiency skills. Grindrod described how his programs help people of all ages learn to broaden their ways of seeing, in order to understand, survive, and thrive in the natural world, and along the way he paused to talk about plants that were native to the area.

…click here to read rest of the article…

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Honing skills that work beyond the wilderness

By TOM RELIHAN
Recorder Staff
Sunday, August 24, 2014
(Published in print: Monday, August 25, 2014)

CONWAY — Frank Grindrod has noticed a trend that disturbs him deeply. To see it, he said, all one must do is compare a child’s ability to recognize corporate logos to their capacity for identifying wild plants and animals.

“You show them a ‘Hello Kitty’ logo and they’re like, ‘Oh, I know that one,’” he said, as we walked through a dense pine forest in Conway. He stopped to bend down and examine a patch of leafy green plants on a plot of land, which had sprung up under a rare, sun-soaked gap in the canopy. Cupping the leaf of one plant in his hand, he said, “But you show them one of these, and they say, ‘Uhh … a fern?”

That trend — one he defined as a decline in knowledge of and appreciation for nature among young people — is one he is determined to change.

“A lot of the nature education is on the surface,” he said. “Some of the kids are good with their hands, and that’s great, but for the ones that aren’t, we feed them stories that they can then share with the group. That way, everyone gets a specialization and it grows exponentially.”

…click here for the whole article…

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“I began to wonder why some kids weren’t out in the park or playground and needed to have everything spelled out for them and facilitated,” Grindrod said, noting that when he was growing up, that type of thing wasn’t as commonplace. “We spent most of our time in the woods, and everyone just had a special call or bell when it was time to come home.”

Learning naturally: Nature programs take the classroom outside

Story by Tom Relihan & Fran Ryan
Wednesday, August 6, 2014
(Published in print: Saturday, August 30, 2014)

As he crested a densely wooded, moss-covered hill in the middle of Conway’s pine forest, Edwin Anderson, 13, of Greenfield yelled, “Wow, come and look at this!

At his call, a half-dozen other kids scrambled up the hill. Some dropped to their knees as they examined a huge brown mushroom protruding from the pine needles on the forest floor. Moments later, Frank Grindrod of Conway knelt in the middle of the group and began to inspect the fungal wonder.

“See how it’s all shaggy on top and on the stipe? This is called ‘The Old Man of the Woods.’” he said. “Oh, and look at this one!” he said, picking up a piece of bark with a couple of fuzzy, pink mushrooms growing on it.

“It looks like the Lorax!” exclaimed one of the campers.

That day, the kids were out in the woods as part of Grindrod’s Earthwork Programs summer camp, which he runs to teach children about nature and develop skills that they can use in their everyday lives.

…click here to read more of this article…

 

“The Pharmacy Is All Around Us”

On November 11, 2013, Frank Grindrod made his first primetime appearance! Here’s the segment from Chronicle, Main Streets episode (you can scroll in about 2:49 minutes to see Frank’s portion about wild edibles; or you can watch the whole segment to see some of our community).

Wild Edibles with Frank Grindrod of Wilderness Survival Training School Earthwork Programs in the Hills of western mass from Frank Grindrod on Vimeo.

The White Pine

Historic White Pine—Past , Present and Future…How the Land, People and Culture Were Transformed

Join me as we walk out into the forest with the snow underneath our feet, looking at the stories that the land holds for us. We see the majestic pine, the one that grows tall through the canopy, like a cathedral, and if you are still and quiet, you’ll hear them whispering. This is an incredible sound…the song of the whispering pines. Throughout the land, we see the majestic white pine that towers over the other trees and is the one that stands out similar to Mount Monadnock amongst all the older mountains that are now rolling hills.

Bears and Pines: Bears use these trees for their height and safety for their cubs. They also use them to keep cool in summer; taking a dip in the lake then climbing these trees close to the top, they sway in the breeze, “evapo cooling” in the treetops above where the wind is. They are brilliant. Next time you’re in bear country, look up and see them chilling out. Check out Lynn Rogers bears.org for amazing facts about bears.

Our Feathered Friends: I have seen countless pine trees having a height of 50 feet or more, and so many of them have squirrel nests (also called drays), hawks’, crows’ and even owls’ nests too. There are so many types of birds—from song birds to raptors and even water birds—where pine provides an important role in their daily life. If you look carefully under these trees, you can find feathers, skulls, bones, pellets and more.

A Historical Perspective: Long ago our white pine was shipped all over the world—England, Spain, Portugal and Africa—for its amazing quality of wood used by woodcarvers, furniture makers, and home builders too. One of the most important things was using the wood for the masts of ships. Every dominant white pine had the Royal Navy’s mark of the King (this was the king’s broad arrow)…a slash that was visible for all to see and it meant that this tree was the property of the English crown. This is what prompted the first of our forest conservation laws, which we still have today.

Today We’ve Learned So Much from our White Pine: We learned from our ancestors, the Native American people. When the Europeans first came over, they got sick, often with scurvy, and the native people helped to heal them with the white pine tree. Vitamin C is in the white pine tree. These photographs show how to make White Pine Tea, which is high in vitamin C (higher than any citrus in the world).

Being able to make white pine tea primitively—rock boil water in a container with the use of fire, and steeping the needles and a using a mortar and pestle in order to get the most amount of surface area to access the properties of the needles—is very empowering to connect with another perspective which helps our relationship with nature.

This tree also contains powerful antioxidants, pro vitamin A and vitamin E along with several B complex vitamins. It also contains several minerals, including potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron and manganese and amino acids.

There is much that we can learn from the white pine…let’s remember that the next time we see one.

Missing Conway Boy Alive After 18 Hours in Freezing Woods

NOTE FROM EARTHWORK PROGRAMS: We are so glad that Cameron was found! We wish we could have been involved in the search in some way…tracking is what we do!

But it also reminds us that we all need to know what to do if/when we are lost–it does happen. Earthwork Programs has been providing wilderness skills programs for more than 10 years. In fact, we were recently at Sanderson Academy with our Lostproofing and the Art of Shelter Workshop and we held an Introduction to Survival Skills Workshop for the community. These are truly useful skills!

Currently, Earthwork Programs is working on grants to bring Lostproofing Workshops to Pioneer Valley schools…


Missing Conway Boy Alive After 18 Hours in Freezing Woods

By Matthew Campbell
Story Published: Nov 25, 2010 at 5:08 PM EST
Story Updated: Nov 25, 2010 at 8:54 PM EST

Some are calling it a Thanksgiving miracle. A seven year old boy lost for nearly 18 hours in sub-freezing temperatures manages to stay alive.

At 9am on Thanksgiving morning, after 18 hours of anguish, Cameron Pleasant’s father can finally relax. His life is back to normal knowing his once lost son was alive and well.

Pleasant jumped into the ambulance that carried his son, hugged the EMT, then proceeded to give Cameron the biggest embrace ever.

A day before, Cameron sparked one of the biggest searches Western Mass has seen all year long.

On Wednesday night, police say the 7 year old Cameron wandered away from his backyard on Mathews Road and vanished into the Conway woods. For 18 hours, he was alone, battling the bitter cold with just a red jacket, a hat and gloves for warmth.

A reverse 911 call was sent to the entire town and soon, hundreds flocked to Conway Grammar School, where Cameron was a first grader. Almost immediately, his place of learning turned into command central for his rescue.

“State Police, EPOs, from the barracks, the Conway police and fire department,” were some of the crews assisting, says MA State Police Lt. Michael Habel.

Lines of tactical crews and hundreds of regular residents piled in. Hours went by as they all combed the woods on ATVs, but there was no sign of the missing boy.

“We listened and waited and listened to helicopters and we were just hopeful,” says neighbor Kathy Desch.

The turning point came in the morning hours. Hours after dawn broke in Conway, searchers were able to spot young Cameron, perched on a ridge.

Cameron was rescued, 3/4 of a mile away from home in a very treacherous part of the woods.

“It was extremely rough terrain, it’s very mountainous and rocky,” Habel says.

The red jacket Cameron was wearing burst through the barren trees, and made the young boy easy to spot. It led to an emotional reunion.

“I’m so delighted. I’m thrilled for them. I was wondering if it was going to have a happy ending. It was very cold last night and we were very worried,” Desch says.

All of the worries were put to rest. Cameron, despite his overnight ordeal, was well enough that an ambulance, instead of a helicopter, rushed him from Franklin County to Baystate in Springfield.

Hospital officials say Pleasant is in good condition.
via Missing Conway Boy Alive After 18 Hours in Freezing Woods | CBS 3 Springfield – News and Weather for Western Massachusetts | Local News.

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