Earthwork Wilderness Survival Training School | 413-340-1161
Star Navigator

The Art of Storytelling & Night Navigation (WS 3)

$45/adult, $25/child with adult prepaid (add $10/person if pay day of)
If you plan to attend all 5 Workshops, PREPAY & SAVE 10%

This is the 3rd Workshop of our Outdoor Adventure & Wilderness Skills WEEKEND GETAWAY!!

You’ll learn about night navigation while storytelling around the campfire.

$45/adult, $25/child with adult prepaid (add $10/person if pay day of)
If you plan to attend all 5 Workshops, PREPAY & SAVE 10%



Outdoor Adventure & Wilderness Skills WEEKEND GETAWAY!
Sat, 5/21, 9:00-12:00, Seeing through the Eyes of Animals (Tracking)
Sat, 5/21, 1:00-4:00, Wild Edibles
Sat, 5/21, 6:00-9:00, Storytelling & Night Navigation
Sun, 5/22, 9:00-12:00, The Art of Fire
Sun, 5/22, 1:00-4:00, Intro to Wilderness Survival

Opportunity to stay overnight on the land (Sat night)!
* Bring own tent & supplies–$5/person
* Rustic cabins w/bunkbeds (bring own linens/sleeping bags)–$8/person (very limited spots)
both options have full use of the kitchen, showers & toilets

Nature Connection and Cultural Mentoring

Nature ConnectionThe Transformational Power of Nature Connection and Cultural Mentoring

Nature connection is not just important but wildly important! The last Valley Kids was packed with several stories on nature-based learning with some powerful evidence to share about Richard Louv, the author of Last Child in the Woods, and his work about Nature Deficit Disorder and what is happening locally and internationally.

What the Research Shows on Nature Deficit Disorder
Nature deficit occurs in kids, adults, families and communities. A study found that young people could identify 1,000 corporate logos but fewer than 10 plants or animals native to their backyards.

Nature is not just important; it is like an essential vitamin for all beings, for our development mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually. Nature learning is part of our genetic makeup; it is in our DNA—we are related to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. We are specially designed for this type of learning. Our eyes can pick out the subtlest movement without looking directly at an object.

OWL EYES is a Routine for Seeing More in Nature
Exercise: Look at this magazine by setting it down in front of you. Allow your eyes to relax, not focusing on the words but a soft look. Next, bring your hands out to your sides, arms extended and wiggle your fingers without looking directly at them (move arms forward a little if you do not see movement). When you see movement, notice your fingers are just on the edge of your vision (this is called “peripheral vision”).

This is a way of seeing more in nature. This is how you spot the hiding deer on your walks through the forest, a spider making a web and you see a strand dance in the breeze glistening from the sun’s light reflecting on it, or the pumping of the tail of a phoebe (fly catcher type of bird) right above you in the canopy as it hunts for insects and snaps it’s beak ever so quietly. Things like these are constantly happening around us.

Mind Workout and Scientific Study
Exercising the power of our senses…sight, smell, hearing, touch and taste…can change your biochemistry. Every time you engage the senses fully, this creates little electrical impulses in the brain and creates new pathways for brain activity. Imagine the possibilities of learning if you are constantly engaging the senses and creating more brain use. Inside our brain, areas are firing that have never been stimulated before when you interact with a plant you recognize, and feel its texture and notice its inside is mucilaginous (slimy); this is a new little electrical storm in your brain.

This electricity can be measured and gives us another reason to be immersed in nature. Having these transformational experiences on a regular basis changes the capacity of the brain and the mind. This provides a holistic way of perceiving reality and perceived reality.

A Walk Alone in the Woods
I was walking barefoot, moving slowly with full awareness, feeling the earth in between my toes as I moved like a heron with such grace and balance and free flowing like the current of the water rolling over the rocks in the stream. As I moved through the tall grass, frogs were still and let me pass, then my eyes noticed movement of a very small bird in the dense thicket. I froze and in that moment, saw a mink, which is a small weasel, on the bank of the stream moving like a shadow gliding along. The bird was the messenger for me to pause and listen. This bird’s body language and movement was erratic and seemed nervous to me. That was all it took, then that magic moment happened, seeing the mink…relaxed and in its natural rhythm, not running from me or hiding.

Powerful Storytelling
As I share this story and describe it in detail, there is a curiosity that is awakened—something primal. This may cause a response of wanting to experience something similar. It gives a reference point of possibility. There is a fire sparked through the power of storytelling and imagination that the listener could be the one who experiences an intimate encounter in nature as well.

Our Role as Mentors
Let’s ask ourselves powerful questions that will foster our relationship and create a powerful culture with nature and people and unite us together. “COME UNITE WITH ME!” This is what the word COMMUNITY is. Here is a question: how do we have “QUALITY NATURE CONNECTION?”  What is the secret to integrating nature into our lives on a regular basis?

We are gardening all the time. Everything we focus on with intent, we can help create. Every time we share nature, we plant seeds.
Are you planting seeds?

Enjoy the Summer!